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Thursday, August 22, 2019

Talk :Relictual Great Apes of Sundaland – Fossil and Prehistoric Orangutans


Talk:Relictual Great Apes of Sundaland – Fossil and Prehistoric Orang

Dear members and friends,

Our talk this time is organised in collaboration with FoSM and we are pleased to have Dr LIM Tze Tshen to share this interesting topic with us.

Topic: Relictual Great Apes of Sundaland – Fossil and Prehistoric Orangutans
Speaker: Dr. LIM Tze Tshen
Date: Thursday 29 August 2019
Time: 7.30-9.30 PM ( Please be on time)
Venue : Islamic Information Centre (Lower Baruk)
Jalan Ong Tiang Swee (behind Swinburne University)

Entrance: Free of charge but donations are always welcome.

Please register by email mnskuching@gmail.com to confirm your seat. Latest by Wednesday 28 August.

Short Abstract:

Orangutan fossils are not uncommonly found among prehistoric faunas across Southeast Asia and southern China. Fossil finds are mostly limited to isolated teeth, jaw and bone fragments from both palaeontological and archaeological sites.

Our current knowledge of the fossil record indicates that this Asian great ape had a broadly continuous distribution across the region, ranging in time from Early Pleistocene to Holocene (2.5 million years ago to present). The modern-day distribution, confines to certain parts of pockets of rainforest in northern Sumatra and Borneo, represents only a small portion of their former geographic range, which includes the Indochinese and Sundaic biogeographic provinces.

This talk will give an overview of what we have learned from the fossil record about the natural history (biogeography, taxonomic diversity, dental size variation over time among different geographic populations, and possible evidence of island dwarfism) of prehistoric orangutans. Evidence for selective hunting by prehistoric humans in Borneo, gathered through the extensive study of the rich zooarchaeological remains from Niah, and its implication for the local demise of the great ape will also be discussed.

Short Biography:

LIM Tze Tshen, University of Cambridge graduate (2018), is a research fellow of the Sarawak Museum Campus Project. By profession, he is a vertebrate palaeontologist and a zooarchaeologist. Lim has carried out systematic research on historical and more recently discovered orangutan fossils kept in museums worldwide.

In collaboration with colleagues from the University of Malaya and Palaeontology Society of Malaysia, he is also actively involved in the search for and study of fossil orangutans recovered from palaeontological sites in Peninsular Malaysia. His current research topics in Sarawak Museum focus on the systematic cataloguing of the rich and diverse zooarchaeological collections stored in the museum, and detailed investigation of the large mammal remains from Niah Caves archaeological sites, particularly, primates and other locally extinct mammal species.

As a biologist, he is keen to explore practical ways through which palaeontological and zooarchaeological findings can turn into effective conservation measures to alleviate the current loss of tropical biodiversity. He also maintains a strong interest in the professional preservation and scientific curation of natural history collections in Malaysia. He is a strong advocate for a dynamic and research-and-education oriented national natural history museum in Malaysia and the relevance of a well-maintained and sufficiently curated natural history museum to the well-being of modern-day society.

Web: https://cambridge.academia.edu/TzeTshenLIM

Regards Cynthia Lobato
MNSKB Secretari

Shorebird Outreach Programme – Batrisyia Teepol

Animals have been a part of the ecosystem even before we were born. But how many of us actually do take notice on their existence? Some do, some don’t and some, yet to.


Bako-Buntal Bay is one of the 55 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) in Malaysia and the first site recognized as the Flyway Network Site of East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) for Malaysia. In order to let the locals see and understand the amazing annual migration of the migratory shorebirds, Malaysian Nature Society Kuching Branch’s intern, Batrisyia Teepol (Conservation Leadership Programme [CLP] Internship) decided to win the hearts of the younger generation. She visited three schools within Bako-Buntal Bay (SK Bako, SK Goebilt and SK Buntal) and shared her knowledge and concerns regarding shorebirds. She believes that education is the most powerful tool that can change the world and for this purpose – conservation.
About a total of 180 students (aged 11-12) participated in the programmes as a whole. She gave talks on shorebirds and why they migrate and dived deeper into plastic awareness. A range of activities were also organized, such as, colouring, presentation by the students and quizzes. The students participated actively and gave their full cooperation. Some students were excellent and showed interests during presentations and Q&A sessions.
With all the talks conducted, she hoped that she has done her part in instilling awareness and compassion for nature among these students and may they be the next leaders – with a passion for conservation.

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Branch report May-July2019

Dear Members

We attach an  update of talks and activities  from May – July 2019 for your information.

Regards,
Cynthia Lobato
MNSKB Secretariat









Talk :Relictual Great Apes of Sundaland – Fossil and Prehistoric Orangutans

Dear members and friends,

Our talk this time is organised in collaboration with FoSM and we are pleased to have Dr LIM Tze Tshen to share this interesting topic with us.

Topic:      Relictual Great Apes of Sundaland – Fossil and Prehistoric Orangutans
Speaker:  Dr. LIM Tze Tshen
Date:       Thursday 29 August 2019
Time:       7.30-9.30 PM ( Please be on time)
Venue :    Islamic Information Centre (Lower Baruk)
                Jalan Ong Tiang Swee (behind Swinburne University)

Entrance: Free of charge but donations are always welcome.

Please register by email  mnskuching@gmail.com to confirm your seat. Latest by Wednesday 28 August.

Short Abstract:
Orangutan fossils are not uncommonly found among prehistoric faunas across Southeast Asia and southern China. Fossil finds are mostly limited to isolated teeth, jaw and bone fragments from both palaeontological and archaeological sites.
Our current knowledge of the fossil record indicates that this Asian great ape had a broadly continuous distribution across the region, ranging in time from Early Pleistocene to Holocene (2.5 million years ago to present). The modern-day distribution, confines to certain parts of pockets of rainforest in northern Sumatra and Borneo, represents only a small portion of their former geographic range, which includes the Indochinese and Sundaic biogeographic provinces. 
This talk will give an overview of what we have learned from the fossil record about the natural history (biogeography, taxonomic diversity, dental size variation over time among different geographic populations, and possible evidence of island dwarfism) of prehistoric orangutans. Evidence for selective hunting by prehistoric humans in Borneo, gathered through the extensive study of the rich zooarchaeological remains from Niah, and its implication for the local demise of the great ape will also be discussed.

Short Biography:
LIM Tze Tshen, University of Cambridge graduate (2018), is a research fellow of the Sarawak Museum Campus Project. By profession, he is a vertebrate palaeontologist and a zooarchaeologist. Lim has carried out systematic research on historical and more recently discovered orangutan fossils kept in museums worldwide.
 In collaboration with colleagues from the University of Malaya and Palaeontology Society of Malaysia, he is also actively involved in the search for and study of fossil orangutans recovered from palaeontological sites in Peninsular Malaysia. His current research topics in Sarawak Museum focus on the systematic cataloguing of the rich and diverse zooarchaeological collections stored in the museum, and detailed investigation of the large mammal remains from Niah Caves archaeological sites, particularly, primates and other locally extinct mammal species. 
As a biologist, he is keen to explore practical ways through which palaeontological and zooarchaeological findings can turn into effective conservation measures to alleviate the current loss of tropical biodiversity. He also maintains a strong interest in the professional preservation and scientific curation of natural history collections in Malaysia. He is a strong advocate for a dynamic and research-and-education oriented national natural history museum in Malaysia and the relevance of a well-maintained and sufficiently curated natural history museum to the well-being of modern-day society.    

Regards Cynthia Lobato
MNSKB Secretariat

Saturday, June 1, 2019

Forest Governance Forest Zonal Workshop 4th-6th October 2019 in Kuching

Dear Members

The Forest Governance Zonal Workshop will to be held in Kuching from 4th-6th October 2019.  Workshop fees, meals and accommodation will be sponsored  by Malaysian Nature Society.   You  will be responsible for your own transportation.

The Workshop  is limited to 30 MNS Members only. If you know someone who is interested to attend but is not an MNS Member, please contact MNS Kuching Branch Secretariat at mnskuching@gmail.com.

If you are interested to attend the Workshop.  please register via Google doc link as stated in the Poster attached herewith. Details and the Programme are also attached herewith.


Cynthia Lobato
Secretariat
MNS Kuching Branch